Aspect Jumping

Aspect Jumping FLOW

Image: J.D. Connor

“The sort of deeply meant aspect jumping we see in TDK is almost absent on television, where shifts from 4:3 to 16:9 and back happen far more often. At some level that isn’t surprising. Hollywood cinema has managed to fret publicly over medium specificity as part of its assertion of cultural primacy even in an era where an ascendant television has made stronger and stronger claims to quality, even superiority. There is a reason that Keanu Reeves can get excited enough about the digital turn that he wants to talk to everyone about it, as he does in the documentary Side by Side (Kenneally, Tribeca, 2012).

But if aspect jumping in film is an occasion for obsession, it has been all but neglected in television studies, and that, too, seems almost natural. Ask yourself: what was the last 4:3 tv show you watched? You probably know that The Master is in limited 70mm release and that it is likely one of the very last films in that format. You probably cannot say what the last 4:3 television series on ABC was. (It was Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.)

Some blame for this ignorance falls to us as scholars. But surely the larger share belongs to television industry itself, which has a vested interest in downplaying epochal events in its own technological history because its industrial organization makes a hash of any such historical breakpoints.” (J.D. Connor, FLOW)

With Media, Parents and Kids Learn More Together

With Media, Parents and Kids Learn More Together - Mind/Shift

Image: Joan Ganz Cooney Center

“Lori Takeuchi, who wrote this report for the Cooney Center along with Reed Stevens, said what parents decide to do with their kids is largely based on their own childhood experiences. Those who grew up on the Internet or were young enough when they started using it in their daily lives have less fear about dangers.

‘They’re comfortable with fewer rules,’ Takeuchi said about the families she studied for the Families Matter Report she wrote earlier this year. Older parents, on the other hand, tend to use parental controls more. ‘Younger parents are willing to confront media and the unknown with their kids, whereas older parents aren’t.’ ” (Tina Barseghian, Mind/Shift)

Clay Shirky: How social media can make history

“What matters here isn’t technical capital, it’s social capital. These tools don’t get socially interesting until they get technologically boring. It isn’t when the shiny new tools show up that their uses start permeating society; it’s when everyone is able to take them for granted.” (Clay Shirky, TED Talks)

Live Streaming As Activism

Live Streaming As Activism - On The Media

Photo: Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

“There were soccer moms streaming live from soccer games. There were people handing out real time live lectures. So students away from the university could ask questions and interact. A lot of nonprofit organizations picked up the tool here in Sweden. A lot of the political parties started to do press conferences.

Then it sort of moved over during the last years to more activists. Live streaming provides them the opportunity to not be afraid of losing their content, because in scenarios where you’re protesting and the police may confiscate your phones, doing a live stream the content is already out there on the Web.” (Mans Adler, On The Media)